Aboriginal bark canoes of the Murray Valley.
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Aboriginal bark canoes of the Murray Valley. by Edwards, Robert

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Published by R. Hale in London .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Australian aborigines -- Australia -- South Australia,
  • Canoes and canoeing -- Australia -- South Australia

Book details:

Edition Notes

ContributionsSouth Australian Museum, Adelaide
Classifications
LC ClassificationsGN666 E38 1973
The Physical Object
Pagination80p.
Number of Pages80
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21213791M

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Aboriginal bark canoes of the Murray Valley Edwards, Robert (YY) Published by Published for the South Australian Museum by Rigby, Australia (). Aboriginal Bark Canoes of the Murray Valley by R Edwards, Rigby is an interesting book which might be in school libraries or available through interlibrary loan. Hollowed out log canoes were used in parts of northern Australia. Aboriginal bark canoes of the Murray Valley. [Robert Edwards; South Australian Museum.] -- "This book describes the canoes of the Aborigines of Australia. In particular, it tells of the simple bark canoe of the Murray Valley and the large river population whose needs it served for many. Great, no issues ABORIGINAL BARK CANOES OF THE MURRAY VALLEY. The Aborigines amazed the early settlers with their skill in maneuvering their flimsy craft. by Robert Edwards. The Aborigines amazed the early settlers with their skill in maneuvering their flimsy craft. by Robert Edwards.

, Aboriginal bark canoes of the Murray Valley / [by] Robert Edwards Rigby for the South Australian Museum Adelaide Wikipedia Citation Please see Wikipedia's template documentation for further citation fields that may be required. The canoe was made by Albert Woodlands, an Indigenous man from the northern coast of New South Wales. It measures cm in length and 45 cm in width. Bark canoes such as this one were used by Aboriginal people for general transport, fishing and collecting birds' eggs from reed beds. In the Dreaming, Ngurunderi travelled down the Murray River in a bark canoe, in search of his two wives who had run away from him. At that time the river was only a small stream, below the junction with the Darling River. A giant cod fish (Ponde) swam ahead of the Ngurunderi, widening the river with sweeps of . Aboriginal bark canoes of the Murray Valley, Adelaide: Rigby for the South Australian Museum, Jenkin, Graham. Conquest of the Ngarrindjeri, Point McLeay, Raukkan Publishers, , 2nd ed Kartinyeri, Doreen. Ngarrindjeri Nation: Genealogies of Ngarrindjeri Families, Taplin, George (ed).

The book covers canoes from Newfoundland to the Pacific Ocean, as well as umiaks and kayaks from the Arctic. Aboriginal Bark Canoes of the Murray Valley Robert Edwards . Additional Physical Format: Online version: Edwards, Robert, Aboriginal bark canoes of the Murray Valley. London, R. Hale [, ©] (OCoLC) Possibly the Port Lincoln area never grew trees of the types which are suitable to provide bark for canoes. But the rivers and lakes of the Murray watershed and drainage system had an abundance of large trees and expanses of calm water, and this is where bark canoes were so common. Aboriginal canoe trees around found along the Murray River. The explorer Edward J. Eyre, Protector of the Aborigines at Moorundie, near Blanchetown, described one canoe as formed from a single piece of bark m long m wide and about 20cm deep. The bow was pointed, slightly more than the stern and the craft had a flat bottom.